Only As Strong As Your Weakest Touch Point

THE MAGIC TOUCH

Any time a customer interacts with your brand directly is called a touch point. Touch points act as an entry into your sales funnel or as the point where your visitors decide to turn away. It doesn’t matter if you have the best product or service, if you have a touch point that fails, you are losing potential customers before they even get a chance to discover all of the greatness you have to offer.

Take A Step Back

Touch points include everything from advertisements, flyers, business cards, blogs, networking and tradeshow presence, to your voicemail manners and anything else your customers come in touch with before, during, and after a sale. Simply just having a touch point in place is no longer an option. Rather, each of your touch points must perfectly represent your brand because this is where potential customers will form their opinion of your company.

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Take a step back and evaluate your brand from an unbiased perspective. Learn to see how the world sees your brand instead of viewing it as the owner of your company or the head of its marketing department. This can help you perfect each touch point so that it meets the needs of each visitor.

Every Touch Point Matters

If every touch point matters, then how do you balance each touch point with your brand? The answer is a simple, three-letter acronym: L.E.T. Б─■ List, Evaluate, Take Action. Managing your touch points through this formula will help you make sure each touch point optimizes, satisfies, and invites.

1) List

Begin by listing all of your current touch points. The key word here is “all.” Be sure to list all of the touch points that your brand uses, including websites, emails, customer service, direct mail, and many others.

By listing each touch point, you can then evaluate each one based on your brand.

2) Evaluate

The next step is to evaluate every single touch point you noted on your list. It is easier if someone else does this for you so that the results are not biased. Your goal with this exercise is to find the weaknesses and not cover them up with explanations. This is a process of discovery, to enable you to find the opportunities and to make corrections.

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3) Take Action

Once you’ve discovered which touch points are your weak links, you can correct any deficits. Remember, deficits are opportunities. Start with your biggest opportunity as that will be your weakest touch point.

Then, begin to implement tools that will help with the ongoing task of monitoring touch points, and keep in mind that as technology changes, so will the effectiveness of each touch point. Some helpful, powerful tools include customer evaluations and site surveys. Remember that this is not about a single touch point, but about all of them. Take the time to evaluate them individually and as a group.

When it comes to marketing, every touch point is an opportunity. How well are your opportunities representing your brand?

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Bullies, Burgers, and Buzz

ThinkstockPhotos-481302289.jpgWhat do Whopper Juniors and bullying have in common these days? They are both being talked about. A LOT.

Recently, Burger King released a three-minute video in honor of National Bullying Prevention month. The viral video revealed that 95 percent of customers were willing to report their smashed, “bullied” Whopper Jr., but only 12 percent stood up for a high school student being harassed in the same store. The “No Junior Deserves to be Bullied” spot received national attention, generating countless online shares and loads of free publicity. One blogger said this:

“Yes, this is basically a three-minute Burger King ad. And, yes, it’s not subtle. But this PSA is better than it has a right to be, and is certainly more than you’d expect from a restaurant that doesn’t really have an ethical obligation beyond selling burgers . . . this weirdly good anti-bullying PSA will wreck your day.”

Viral: Why Certain Messages Multiply

Have you ever wondered why some YouTube videos go viral? Or why some products receive more word-of-mouth and top-of-mind awareness? Whether we’re in marketing, politics, or public health, it’s helpful to consider why certain products or ideas catch fire. Wharton marketing professor Jonah Berger, author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On, devoted nearly a decade to researching this very question. We all know that word-of-mouth marketing is the most dynamic form of influence, but why do some things seem to create more buzz? Berger gives several ideas for getting your ideas to stick and to SPREAD.

  1. Social Currency. What we talk about influences how other people see us – whether we look clever, silly, or thoughtful. How can our product or idea be a fun or interesting thing for someone to share with others? Many who shared the Burger King ad found it to be a compelling social commentary, a fun (but thoughtful) perspective worthy of passing along.
  2. Triggers. People often talk about whatever comes to mind. Just like a Subway ad might be effective in a subway station, a trigger is an association that prompts people to think about related things. Burger King wisely released this PSA during Bullying Prevention month, because what is on the top of the mind is often at the tip of the tongue. Burgers and bullies were on our lips in October.
  3. Emotion. How can we craft messages and ideas that make people feel something? Our relational bent prompts us to share things that are surprising, inspiring, funny, beautiful, or motivating. Burger King tapped into a heartfelt issue, knowing that when we care, we are more likely to share!
  4. Stories Sell. Why are Super Bowl commercials so fun? Because nothing tops a great story, and these ads tell them well. Top marketers know that one way to replicate a message is to embed it in a “Trojan Horse,” or a noteworthy narrative people are bound to repeat. In this instance, the Whopper Junior had a supporting role in the greater story of bullying and social justice. But Contagious reminds us the product or idea has to be essential to the plotline: “We need to make our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it.”

Getting Your Message to Spread and Stick

Looking for ways to get your message to spread and your brand to stick? From large-scale publicity to customer care and referral options, we have opportunities in all sizes. We’ll help you package your stories, triggers, and ideas with several time-tested tools and tricks. Give us a call to talk options!

Ways to Protect Your Brand in the Real-Time Information Age

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A brand is more than just a company logo, and it’s bigger than any one particular product or service. Instead, it’s the feeling that people get when they think about your company. It’s what goes into the instinct they have regarding whether or not to make a purchase.

 

A brand is also massively important in terms of how successful your marketing efforts will be in the long-term. The impression someone has of your brand is something that occurs almost immediately.  48% of consumers say that they are more likely to become loyal to a brand if their first experience is a positive one, regardless of whether or not that experience actually took the form of a purchase.

That means your brand must be protected at all costs, particularly in the real-time information age that we’re now living in. People are being marketed to from nearly every angle. If you don’t work hard to strengthen and hone your brand, you run the risk of being lost in the shuffle. Hope is not lost, however, as there are a few key things you can do to protect your brand as much as you can.

Consistency is Key

One of the most important things you can do to protect your brand is focus on something that real-time information doesn’t provide: consistency. According to one study, 90% of consumers expect that their experience with a brand will be similar across all channels – whether you’re talking about print, in-person interactions, or digital content.

Don’t Wait For Your Audience to Come to You

Another study estimates that, on average, you really need about five to seven positive brand impressions with a consumer before they start to remember your brand in a similar light. This is good, but you need to remember that in a real-time information age, you don’t necessarily have the time to wait for a consumer to initiate those impressions.

Also, consider the fact that brands that are consistently presented are three to four times more likely to experience brand visibility. YOU must be reaching out to your audience by way of consistent, enjoyable and helpful experiences whenever and wherever you can. Increase the frequency of the print marketing collateral that you’re putting out there and focus on being helpful, educational, and informative.

The Unmistakable Benefits

Give people as many opportunities to experience your brand as you possibly can and your entire identity will benefit as a result. If brand visibility is something of a numbers game, you need to play those numbers as well as you possibly can. Don’t wait for someone else to hopefully do it for you.

Successful branding brings with it a wide range of different benefits, from increased customer loyalty to an improved image, to a relatable identity and beyond. But in an age where information is everywhere, your brand is something that you also need to work hard to proactively protect. If you don’t, you run the risk of watching those important relationships with your audience begin to deteriorate

Reputation Management: Why You Need to Keep a More Proactive Watch Over Your Most Valuable Asset

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While it’s true that your brand’s reputation will play a significant role in an essential factor like word-of-mouth, the real power of paying attention to what people are saying about you runs a bit deeper.

 

The Importance of Reputation Management: Facts and Figures

Consider the following statistics to help paint a vivid picture of the situation you’re dealing with:

  • According to one study, an incredible 74% of people now consult Yelp or a similar service when looking for some type of business or service provider – even if they plan on carrying on a relationship exclusively in “real life.”
  • The above statistic may actually be on the conservative side – another study indicated that 97% of consumers say that they read online reviews about local businesses on a regular basis before deciding whether or not to make a purchase.
  • Speaking of which, a one-star rating hike on a service such as Yelp often equates to a 5% to 9% rise in overall revenue. Let that sink in for just a second.
  • Another study by the World Economic Forum revealed that on average, more than 25% of a company’s market value could be tied back directly to its reputation and general perception.
  • A massive 86% of people say that they would pay more for services if they could guarantee they were being provided by a company with higher ratings and a larger number of positive reviews.

As these and other statistics indicate, reputation management is a lot more than just doing what you can to control word of mouth. Even people who discover your brand, your products, or your services entirely independently of anyone else could still shy away from that purchase if your reputation isn’t what they were expecting.

The most alarming statistic of all, however, is the fact that 50% (!) of business owners say that they have found incorrect information on their business listings. This means that not only is this info damaging your reputation in a potentially harmful way to your bottom line, but it’s doing so needlessly as it is incorrect in the first place.

Getting a Grip on Your Reputation

The most important thing to understand about reputation management is that it is NOT something you do once and then forget about. This will require you to look online on a regular basis to see what people are saying about you, what information is getting posted, and taking advantage of any opportunities for course correction as they present themselves.

But even going beyond just correcting false information, there are a number of other essential proactive steps you can take to help strengthen your reputation as much as possible.

Send follow-up surveys to buyers to see what you did properly and, more importantly, what mistakes you made. If someone sends you an email with a legitimate issue, be sure to follow-up on that issue within 24 hours.

Never, under any circumstances, encourage people to leave “fake” or “artificial” reviews about you or a competitor. The consequences far outweigh anything you will gain. This includes offering gifts for good reviews.  If you’re caught, and you likely will be, there is no telling what damage you might sustain.

In the end, reputation management is something that you will have to do on a regular basis moving forward. It’s a large part of why many businesses hire employees with this particular job in mind. But then again, when you’re talking about what is arguably the most valuable asset your business has, it makes perfect sense that this amount of effort would be required.

Smart Companies Get People Talking

YAKETY-YAK, GO TALK BACK

Growing your brand and business takes work. When you take advantage of the right tools it can help you become more visible, gain the trust of others, and increase your bottom line. Although technology is a helpful way to enhance your marketing strategy, sometimes, going back to the basics can also be one of the best things you can do.

What is the one tactic that has always worked?

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You can’t buy this type of advertising, and when people recommend your business, others listen. Knowing the five Ts of word-of-mouth marketing and how it can work for you is key. Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Talkers

Who will tell their friends about you? Be tuned in to who will tell others about your business. Think about what you can do to get them talking and take it from there. If you’re offering specials, these are the people you give the exclusive deal to first, and then tell them to tell others. Make them an ambassador of sorts by giving others a discount when they mention that person’s name.

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2. Topics

What will they talk about? Is your business very accommodating? How is your customer service? What does your website look like? Can they place an order online? All of these make a difference and helps the talkers sing your praise.

3. Tools

How can you help the message travel? Be proactive. Have the talkers link you to their social media. Have you ever had a social session at your place of business? Get the radio station down there, have some freebies and discounts, and make it a community event.

4. Taking Part

How should you join the conversation? Have you partnered with the schools to do something for free, or have you volunteered to speak about what you do? Meet the neighboring businesses. Join the Chamber of Commerce and network. Engage with your audience on social media. Not to sell anything, but to have a real conversation. All of this makes a difference and gives the talkers something to talk about. When you join the conversation in a non-selling way, you welcome a better response for other channels of marketing later, like a targeted direct-mail campaign.

5. Tracking

How will you know what people are saying about you? Once you have implemented tools like savings discounts and specials, and have partnered with the community, you will get the feedback you are seeking. If your customer base is growing, you will know people are talking. Get people to add a review or two online, so others who are searching for your services will be able to read first-hand reviews

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Use these five Ts of word-of-mouth marketing and watch how impactful it can be. Integrating the old with the new can be effective and produce amazing results now and in the future.

 

Once Upon a Time

thinkstockphotos-527228156Storytelling is a time-honored tradition which began before humanity had the ability to create long-lasting printed documents. The first stories were a way of passing on an oral tradition and history of various cultures around the world. There is still a storytelling tradition in many cultures, although as communities spread out, storytelling has moved to written, printed, and now digital methods of recording the tales. Oral traditions created a rich history for ancient cultures that gave rise to much of what we call myths and legends today, a blend of history and religion which gave purpose to people who lived short and often harsh lives.

Role of Printing in Storytelling

The development of the printing press gave stories new life because they could be disseminated on a broader scale and replicated easily. No longer were scribes necessary for copying expensive books and papers. Not only was the rich, cultural history and religious beliefs of various people shared among a wider community, but pure fiction was written for the purpose of entertainment and enjoyment for the masses. For those who were not taught to read, stories were read and passed around by those who could.

Storytelling in the Digital Age

While it has become easier to distribute stories in the digital age, and more of the world’s population is educated enough to read, storytelling continues to be a powerful way to distribute a message to people. Computers and the internet make spreading the word faster, but the concept of an oral tradition is easily seen in the many repetitions of news stories online from different slants or points of view. The question lies in how an entity or brand can create a unified story to present to an audience or market. With the unique ability to duplicate digital image and print and distribute them through many channels, storytelling can be a powerful tool for marketing a company or organization.

Incorporating Storytelling in Marketing and Branding

A recent article in Search Engine Journal(https://www.searchenginejournal.com/5-benefits-using-storytelling-marketing/164213/) discusses the benefits of storytelling as a method for branding. The author, Katy Katz, talks about how storytelling creates connections and potential bonds between a brand and a market. When thinking about storytelling for a brand, call to mind some of the brands that you grew up with that have become common words in the American culture such as Kleenex, Coke or Pampers, often used to replace the actual word for the item being talked about. While creating a storytelling campaign for your own brand may not turn it into a common household word, you will still be able to cement the story with the brand name to create lasting memories in the minds of your audience.

Benefits of Brand Storytelling

Katz mentions 5 benefits to brand storytelling in her article.

1. Storytelling builds memories.
2. Storytelling is a natural motivator.
3. Storytelling builds relationships.
4. Storytelling makes content exciting.
5. Storytelling can make something old, new again.

How Can You Use these Benefits to Your Advantage in Marketing?

Since most businesses have competitors that offer products or services that are similar to theirs, branding offers a way to show your differences. Creating a brand story or even just telling your brand’s story in a cohesive manner can give your audience reasons to bond with you beyond pricing or product quality. An excellent example of brand storytelling is the way Tom’s Shoes has incorporated their brand name with their history of giving. (http://www.toms.com/stories/giving/10-years-of-giving-together) They have created not only an excellent product, but a compelling reason to buy from them.

You can do the same.