The Answer is in Your Hands

kirkI heard an interesting story about an old man. According to legend, he could answer any question asked of him correctly. Two young boys heard of his wisdom and thought they could fool him, so they caught a small bird and went to his home. One of the boys held his hands out covering the tiny bird and asked the old man if the bird was dead or alive.

Without hesitation, the old man replied, “Son, if I were to say that the bird is alive, you would close your hands and crush the bird to death. If I were to say the bird is dead, you would open your hands, and it would fly away. You see, you hold the answer in your own hands.”

Here’s the way I see it: Your hands are capable of whatever goal you are looking to achieve. However, the trick is learning to use them to your advantage. If you have an important print project coming up, we’d love to help so that you can focus on more important things.

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What Google’s Mistakes Can Teach Us About Leadership

ThinkstockPhotos-616237916.jpgOne of the things that Google is famous for is data-based decision making. When they want to find the most effective way to do something, they look at the numbers and work from there. However, even a company as married to analytics as Google is vulnerable to lapses and oversights. Recently, their data showed that their process for hiring and promoting the best managers for the job was all wrong.

When you look at where Google made their mistake and what they did to correct it, you could save your company some money and heartache and also create a more effective workplace.

Google’s Error and Assumption

Besides a dedication to data, Google’s other key characteristic is a high regard for technical expertise. Tech savviness was so prized that, historically, it was one of the top factors in whether someone would get promoted to management.

When Google set out to learn whether their hiring and promoting strategy was working, they discovered something interesting: the best managers were not necessarily the ones who were technical experts at all.

After gathering and analyzing data from 10,000 manager observations, they learned that the quality they valued most had almost no bearing on whether someone was a good manager. Instead, soft skills were what made all the difference.

What the Data Says Makes a Good Manager

Google used their large pool of data to identify eight qualities and habits that make great managers. While technical skill was on the list, it was the least important of all the qualities on it. In order of importance, the qualities that make great managers include:

  • Good coaching.
  • Empowering your team to work without micromanaging. A good manager hires good people, then gets out of their way.
  • Interest in employees’ well-being and success. People are more motivated and show greater job satisfaction when they know that the people they work under care about them.
  • A results-oriented and productive outlook.
  • Excellent communication skills, especially good listening.
  • An interest in employees’ career development. Good managers understand that we all do better when we all do better.
  • A clear vision and strategy.
  • Key technical skills. These aren’t important because your manager will be doing hands-on work, by the way. They are important because it allows the manager to advise the team that they’ve assembled for the job.

In addition to the revelations above, Google discovered a lot about the types of managers who make employees happy. The most important quality is a calm demeanor and an even keel. In a high-stress environment, someone who keeps things steady is key. They also discovered that the best leaders puzzled through problems with employees instead of just telling them what to do.

By looking at the real data about good managers, Google was able to improve their hiring practices, improve worker satisfaction, and increase productivity.

The biggest takeaway? Always challenge your assumptions. You may learn that what you thought was effective may be harming your company more than it helps. By taking an honest look at your analytics, you can seize startling revelations. Use them to make your company a better place and to rise above the competition.

Triumph over Adversity

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Many of the most successful leaders in the world have been people who have triumphed over adversity. This list of individuals includes celebrities, world leaders, and business people. Notable figures include Nelson Mandela who spent 27 years in prison before finally becoming President in South Africa and Steve Jobs who was fired from his own company. Many people fail in their lifetimes, and then go on to become successful. Failure in itself is not the end. Instead, it is a lesson that can be applied to future endeavors.

What Can Failure Teach Us?

Without learning how to fail and pick yourself up again, most people would never learn anything new or complete any task. It is an accomplishment to fail, and then go on to make something of yourself by admitting that you have failed and refusing to be deterred from your final goal. While this concept can apply to any endeavor in life, it is certainly a concept that can be easily applied to business.

Living with Failure in Business

The business world is full of failures. Companies often have products that do not do well in the marketplace among the mix of products that they sell. In fact, most sales teams figure failure into their daily routine since they know that they will have to approach a lot of leads before they can turn some of them into buying customers. Many successful salespeople use rejections to tally how well they are doing. For instance, they may decide to make enough cold calls over the phone each day to tally up to a hundred “no, thank you’s.” The reason they count those no’s is that they realize that if they receive a hundred no’s, they will also have enough yes’s in that group of phone calls to make the quota of appointments they need to have.

Failure is a Requirement for Success

“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” – Robert F. Kennedy

Greatness can only be achieved by someone who understands what it takes to become great. Therefore, failure is a requirement for success because it takes failure to appreciate success. While not every one of us needs to spend 27 years in prison to finally achieve our goals, the truth remains that unless we persevere towards our goals, we will not be able to achieve success in our careers or life.

Dealing with Failure in Business

As a business owner, it is very likely that you will make mistakes, disappoint staff and customers, and lose business from time to time. However, each time failure occurs, it is best to admit the failure, and then examine why it happened. By learning from our mistakes, we become better business owners and better people. Failure helps us relate to others who have experienced hard times and gives us the opportunity to connect with them as customers.

Dealing with Future Adversity

The next time you or one of your employees fails at a task, take the time to use the failure as an opportunity to learn and improve. Maybe the failure of one person can become a lesson for everyone, and it will lead to the next big success for your entire company.

Busy is a State of Mind; How to Stay Productive When You’re the Boss

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From a certain perspective, employees have it relatively easy. They don’t have a choice regarding what type of work they’re doing or when they’re doing it. Productivity is dictated not only by the company they work for but by the people they answer to. If they don’t have a spark of creative inspiration on their way to work one morning, that’s just too bad – the work needs to be done no matter what. This can be incredibly motivating from a certain perspective.

When you’re the boss, however, you aren’t quite so lucky.

When you’re the person in charge of steering the ship, there WILL be mornings where you don’t feel as creative as you need to be. There will be days where being productive seems impossible, regardless of how hard you try. If you want to be able to stay as creative and as productive as possible, even when you don’t have to answer to anybody but yourself, there are a few key things you’ll want to keep in mind.

It’s All About Momentum

Staying productive when you’re the boss may require you to think about things a bit differently from how you’re used to. One of the most valuable assets that you have on your side will be momentum, but unfortunately, that driving force isn’t just going to create itself.

Say you have a big task ahead of you that needs to be completed by a specified date. When you look at it as a single goal, it can understandably seem insurmountable – particularly if you have nobody to answer to but yourself. However, if you were to break it down into a number of smaller, more straightforward tasks, suddenly you’re building the type of momentum that will carry you far.

Start by making a list of all the more minor things you need to accomplish that will eventually add up to your singular large goal. It’s important that you don’t try to keep a record of this in your head – write it down on a piece of paper or in a word document on your computer. Doing so will help you visualize both what needs to be done, and the forward progress that you’re making. Turn every task less into something that needs to be done and more into a single problem that you need to solve. As you do, physically check each item off the list. The benefit of this method is that you can SEE how much you’re accomplishing, even if you haven’t technically completed that one larger goal yet. Every time you cross off another task, you’re building a little bit of momentum that will drive you forward to the next waypoint. Before you know it, all of those small individual items that seem insignificant by themselves will add up to the proverbial end zone that you were working towards in the first place. You’re not doing any more or less work – you’re just shifting the way you think about the task at hand when you don’t have anyone to look to for motivation other than yourself.

Slow and Steady Wins the Race

Creativity is the same way. Instead of looking at something as a single, big task to be completed, be it a piece of creative material or a catchy new slogan for your business, look at it as a series of small puzzles to be solved. Visualize the amount of work to be done and the amount of progress you’ve made thus far. Before you know it your creative problem will be solved, even if you weren’t necessarily feeling creative yourself along the way.

For those days where creativity seems fruitless and remaining productive seems all but impossible, remember a very mere fact of the business world that you’ve likely forgotten. Even though you’re the boss, you DO have someone that you’re answering to, the client. Put yourself in the mindset of one of your employees – what would you tell them if they were supposed to turn in that big project but didn’t because they just weren’t “feeling creative enough”? You’d say “too bad – it’s too important, it needs to be done.” Because the work IS too important and it DOES need to be done. As the boss, it isn’t so much that you’re answering to someone (in this case, the client), but more that someone genuinely depends on you. It’s your job not to let them down in any way possible.

Moving Beyond Just Increasing Productivity

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Man drawing successful earnings result chart

Thanks largely to the fact that there is a lot of work to be done and only so many hours in a day to do it, many business owners tend to think of raising productivity as their primary objective at any given time. Unfortunately, this isn’t really the case – it only appears to be on the surface.

Consider the fact that “productivity” as a metric is not something that you can improve indefinitely. You can only find new and innovative ways to raise the amount of work you’re able to do so far before you hit a period of diminishing returns. People WILL get overworked, at which point you’re farther away from your ultimate goal of “do the best work possible, no exceptions” than you were when you started.

Increasing productivity is a means to an end: it is not the end in and of itself. Instead, there are far more important things for running a successful business that you should be focusing on.

Don’t Focus on Outcomes. Focus on Processes

When people place all of their emphasis on increasing productivity, “work harder” tends to become the mantra of the day. However, the old phrase of “work smarter, not harder” still very much applies – or at least it should for the best results.

Focus less on what your employees can do and more on how they’re able to do it. Does your management style create unnecessary waste in the daily workflows of your staff? Do what you can to eliminate it wherever possible. Would giving your employees the ability to work remotely make their lives easier, thus increasing the QUALITY of the work they’re able to offer? It’s something you should consider.

Instead of looking at work as an issue of quantity, look to quality wherever possible. Do whatever it takes to improve HOW your employees are working and rest assured, WHAT they’re able to do will improve as a result.

Keep Everyone on the Same Page

As time goes on, one of the biggest challenges that business leaders face tends to be one of communication. Remember that every department or team in your business isn’t acting in a vacuum – they’re all essentially working together to form the single cohesive whole that is your business in the first place. A vacuum is exactly what is created when you don’t take the time to periodically redefine exactly what a person or team’s purpose is, what they’re doing and (most importantly) why that matters.

Giving people a mission that is unclear or that lacks focus is an excellent way to lower engagement at the same time. Always take the time to make sure that everyone has their “eye on the prize,” so to speak, regarding why they should care and what the prize is they should be eyeing.

These are just a few of the factors that are far more important than the blanket concept of “increased productivity” in the world of business. In fact, you’ll often find that when you take the time to focus on other areas of your business to help create the well-oiled machine you always wanted to be running, productivity tends to increase on its own as a result. Workflows become easier to sustain, and communication becomes clearer, paving the way for the high volume of quality, timely production you were after in the first place.

Ways to Recharge for Successful Entrepreneurs

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businessman relaxing 

Entrepreneurs are a different lot. It takes a certain type of person to hang out there on the edge and take calculated (and sometimes not so calculated) risks. The rush of adrenaline that keeps tycoons in the sweet spot of success can wear a person out, though. The hard-charging, always-ready attitude is a unique quality that has its own set of rules when it comes to taking a little downtime without losing precious time and opportunities. The following are excellent strategies for how to recharge for moguls of business.

Contemplation
There is no “right” or “wrong” way to sit quietly for a few minutes a day. Taking the time to think and contemplate things is a real game changer. It teaches you to quiet your mind and gives that big brain of yours time to rest. That’s all it is. Give it a try. Take 20 minutes and sit quietly. Let your thoughts come in and gently focus on them one at a time, allowing yourself to sit in silence. Over time, the effects build and offer a calmer mind and body, heightened focus, more patience, and greater productivity.

Movement
Your doctor and Jillian Michaels are right. Exercise is especially critical for entrepreneurs. You may feel like you are going 100 MPH on any given day and do not need “additional” activity, but get outside and take a brisk walk. You can even take the time to think at the same time. It’s a twofer for the multi-tasking magnate in you.

Experience the Outdoors
Great Scott! Throw nature in the mix and it’s a “three-fer” (it’s a real word – scout’s honor). The outdoors can spark relaxation, creativity, and help stave off burnout. Daily exposure to natural surroundings will give you the fuel to get back in the office and power through your day.

Schedule Your Time
Keep a single calendar that gives you mandated time each day to walk away from your desk, your phone, and your email. Maybe a couple of 10-15 minute breaks that give you time to stretch your legs, interact on a social level, grab a (healthy) snack or call a loved one. This single calendar will house business related obligations and personal outings and priorities. Seeing all of your obligations in one place helps eliminate the over-scheduled executive trap and gives you the opportunity to see, in black and white, how you are spending your time. In addition to your breaks, dedicate some time to your meal periods. Maybe you do not want to allocate an hour per day for lunch. At the very least, turn off your electronic world for 15-20 minutes and give your food your full attention. Think of it as “eating meditation.”

Unplug
Unplugging from all electronics, while a little frightening at first, can help alleviate a ton of stress. Think about it; all of those dings and beeps and buzzes that are always pulling at every last ounce of concentration you have. There’s only so much a person can take. Every tweet, poke, Instagram, Snapchat, email and reminder activates responses in you that eventually lead to mental and emotional breakdowns. It’s a daunting prospect, but consider taking an hour away from all electronics and build from there. Who knows, maybe you could allocate an entire electronics-free day or evening. Your creativity and your soul will thank you.

These few tips can help avoid burnout and create the optimal environment for the successful entrepreneur in you.

Cowboy Wisdom

 

I came across an article that featured words of cowboy wisdom. Here are a few of my favoritekirks that I thought you might also enjoy:

  • Life is simpler when you plow around the stump.
  • A bumble bee is faster than a John Deere tractor.
  • Words that soak into your ears are whispered, not yelled.
  • Forgive your enemies – it messes with their heads.
  • You can’t unsay a cruel thing.
  • Every path has some puddles.
  • When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.
  • Most of the stuff people worry about never happens.
  • Don’t squat with your spurs on.
  • Don’t judge people by their relatives.
  • Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.
  • Don’t interfere with something that isn’t bothering you.
  • If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.
  • Always drink upstream from the herd.
  • If you’re riding ahead of the herd, look back now and then to make sure they’re still with you.
  • Never miss a good chance to shut up.

Here’s the way I see it: Knowledge comes from learning. Wisdom comes from living. If you have printing questions or need advice for your next big project, our team is here to help. Give us a call today at 856.429.0715 or visit: http://www.sjprinter.com